What are the routes like?

What are the routes like?

The big question on everyone’s lips who haven’t done the Ring of Beara before is, what are the routes like?
There are two stunning routes 140km or 110km cycle along the rugged Wild Atlantic Way coastal route of the Beara Peninsula.
The 110km route encompasses some of Ireland’s most picturesque and quaint towns including Ardgroom, Eyeries, Castletownbere, Adrigole, Glengarriff and Kenmare town.
Participants will travel by the rugged coast and can embrace the breath-taking scenery around every corner. There are food stops dotted along the way. Here cyclist can refuel, refresh and regroup before continuing their journey along the peninsula.
The 140km route embraces Allihies, which is the most western parish of the Beara Peninsula. Allihies provides an idyllic location for a food stop on the 140km route. Cyclist can marvel the beauty of this village. Looping around Cod head towards Black Bell Head, cyclists can revel in the views of Dursey Island.
At Castletownbere the 110k and 140k route re-join together. Castletownbere is the largest town on the peninsula and offers cyclists the opportunity to refuel before travelling along the coast towards Glengarriff. This section of the route offers panoramic views of Whiddy Island and Seal harbour.
Cyclists will ascend the world famous Caha pass and be enchanted by the breath-taking views of Barley Lake on the left and the rolling hills on the right. The spectacular view from the top makes the effort worthwhile. As participants enter the hand-carved Turners Tunnels they leave Cork behind and descend along the Sheen Valley.
Participants will be rewarded with a finishers’ medal, hot food, hot tubs, massage and entertainment.
There are rolling hills and deep valleys along the route with 4 major climbs to conquer including a 5km gradual climb near Laragh, a short sharp hill outside the village of Allihies, a 4km pull out of Castletownbere and an exhilarating high with the stunning Caha Pass.

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